For business owners and managers, a shortage of goods (food, healthcare products, drugs, etc.) creates a heightened sense of focus, and stress, on how to solve the shortage. A pandemic takes that stress to 11 - a rude awakening for what needs to be done despite no clear path for how the shortages can be solved. 

Early in the Covid-19 pandemic, grocery stores, hospitals, and countless other businesses had to pivot, sometimes daily, to ensure they had what was needed to function, to provide for those who relied on them. Early on, many companies shifted to help our healthcare industry meet their demands. Organizations like Open Source Medical Supplies helped to facilitate this shift. 

Our medical supply chain needs to be resilient, as Douglas Hannah suggests. And his article identifies how to achieve resiliency. But his article serves equally well to show how other industries can learn from a pandemic - how to not only survive, but to thrive. This includes our food supply chain and how grocery stores source their products. 2020, when evaluated for what it can teach us, can serve as enlightened of how to address needs you may not necessarily expect.